RSI Visits White House to Discuss Trucks Sizes and Weights

RSI visits White HouseOn October 28, 2015, RSI President Tom Simpson, along with several other stakeholders including safety advocates, short line railroad, and trucking company representatives attended a meeting with the White House’s National Economic Council Senior Policy Advisor Jake Broder-Fingert to discuss the perils of longer and heavier trucks. Specifically, Simpson spoke to the issue of freight diversion with bigger trucks and the effect that would have on the current rail car fleet and the railway supply industry.

The group’s message was simple – longer heavier trucks are not only a major safety hazard, but they will continue to destroy the country’s infrastructure, as well as, divert traffic from the railroads and negatively impact the rail supply industry which translates to a loss of domestic manufacturing and transportation jobs.

Both the Senate and House FY16 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development bills included policy riders which would allow double 33′ tractor trailer trucks even though the recent DOT Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Limits Study concluded there is a “profound” lack of data from which to quantify the safety impact of larger or heavier trucks.

RSI POSITION: RSI adamantly opposes this proposed change in law and is actively working with our partners and members to not have this language included in the final FY 2016 Omnibus spending bill which Senate and House Appropriations Committee staff is currently working on.

If you would like further information on you can help with the TSW fight, please contact Nicole Brewin (brewin@rsiweb.org) and stay tuned for Legislative Action Alerts on this very topic.

Pictured in photo: (left side back to front) Lane Kidd, Trucking Alliance, Greg Hynes, SMART, Jo Strang, ASLRRA, Tom Simpson – RSI, Fred McLuckie, Teamsters (right side back to front) Alan Maness, State Farm Ins. Cos. Jackie Gillian, Advocates for Highway Safety Joan Claybrook, Head of table: Fred McLuckie, Teamsters